Oral Health Challenges for Children with Disabilities

6 Oral Health Challenges for Children with Disabilities

​Some children with disabilities have challenges that affect their oral health. These challenges may include:

  • 1. Children with physical disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, may not have the motor skills needed to use a toothbrush safely or to sit still in a dental chair during dental visits.
  • 2. Children with intellectual disabilities may not know how to brush their teeth, protect their teeth from injury, or cooperate with dental office staff while getting oral health care.
  • 3. Children with communication disorders, such as delayed speech and language development, may not be able to tell their parents that their mouth hurts or they have a toothache.
  • 4. Children who get frequent medical care, such as having many doctor visits or hospital stays, may be afraid of the dental office and may not cooperate during visits.
  • 5. Children who take medicines with added sugars or that cause dry mouth are at high risk for tooth decay. Sugar is added to some medicines to make them taste better. Other medicines used to treat cerebral palsy, seizures, and depression can cause dry mouth by lowering the amount of saliva in the mouth. Saliva plays an important role in preventing tooth decay. Medicines given to children with medical diseases or disorders, such as asthma or allergies, can also cause dry mouth.
  • 6. Children on special diets may be at high risk for developing tooth decay. Foods that are soft or high in starch (for example, potatoes or corn) stick to children’s teeth and give caries-causing bacteria in the mouth more time to cause tooth decay.

Article Featured on Healthy Children


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Biermann Orthodontics

503-690-0722
17885 NW Evergreen Parkway, Suite 200
Beaverton, OR 97006

Healthy Diet For Kids

Healthy Teeth and Your Child’s Diet

Article Featured on HealthyChildren

Besides regular toothbrushing, your child’s diet will play a key role in his dental health.

Why Sugar is the Big Villain

The longer and more frequently his teeth are exposed to sugar, the greater the risk of cavities. “Sticky sugar” foods such as sticky caramel, toffee, gum, and dried fruit—particularly when it stays in his mouth and bathes his teeth in sugar for hours—could do serious damage.

  • Make sure to always brush your child’s teeth after a sugary food item.
  • Do not allow young children to have any sugar-containing liquid in a sippy cup for a prolonged period. 

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Start Proper Oral Hygiene Early

Start Proper Oral Hygiene Early

When To Start Proper Oral Hygiene For Kids

Many parents want to know: At what age should I brush and floss my child’s teeth? A good rule is to start flossing as soon as the child has teeth that are in contact with each other, usually around age two to three years. Once teeth reach this point, food particles can get caught between them and foster the growth of bacteria and the development of plaque. Not all children need to have their teeth flossed at this age, so ask your dentist for advice. But the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents should be brushing a toddler’s teeth twice daily with a soft-bristled brush specially designed for toddlers’ small mouths and delicate gums, like the Oral-B® Stages® line of toothbrushes.

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How to Prevent Thumbsucking in Children

Break The Thumbsucking Habit

It’s not uncommon for a child to suck his or her thumb, or the lip, or a finger, as a way to self-soothe or to help fall asleep.

Most children outgrow thumb sucking between ages 2 and 4 years, which is the time when the first baby teeth fall out and permanent teeth appear. But it’s important to break a child of a thumb-sucking habit before the permanent teeth start to arrive in order to prevent problems with tooth alignment and development of the mouth.

How intensely your child sucks his or her thumb can make a difference in the risk of problems with dental health later on. A child who sucks the thumb or finger aggressively is at greater risk for damaging teeth than a child who keeps a thumb or finger passively in the mouth.

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Healthy Halloween Treats

14 Healthy Halloween Recipes

BY SOPHIA BREENE | Featured on Greatist

Hosting a Halloween party this year? Treat friends to fun homemade goodies—these 14 recipes are a bit healthier, much cuter, and way more inventive than prepackaged candies. From fresh fruit to low-fat cheese, these tasty All Hallow’s Eve recipes from around the web won’t send you running to the dentist.

1. Candy Corn Chicken Quesadillas

Start the evening with a nutritious, protein-rich dinner that will keep you fueled through hours of Trick or Treating (or Monster Mashing). Add some fiber by subbing in whole-wheat tortillas.

2. Gluten-Free Spiderweb Cupcakes

These healthier treats are made with almond flour, coconut oil, and unsweetened applesauce. Make the creepy-crawly design by dragging a toothpick through the center of concentric circles of icing.

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5 Tricks for Dealing With Halloween Treats

Oral Health Challenge: 5 Tricks for Dealing With Halloween Treats

Article By  | Featured on WebMD

Children’s Halloween dream — to get lots of candy — can be their parents’ nightmare. But pediatric dental experts say Halloween can be a time to teach your children good oral health habits for life, without depriving them of Halloween treats (think moderation). Here are their five best tricks for healthy teeth.

Halloween Candy vs. Cavities: Don’t Make Kids Choose

Don’t deny your children the Halloween experience. That can send the entirely wrong message — deprivation — and make candy seem even more irresistible, leading to other problems. They may end up sneaking sweets or eating too much candy once they’re out on their own. Instead, let them have the joy of Halloween in all its sticky goodness and the experience of going to a party or trick-or-treating.

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Dental Bridges

Types of Dental Bridges

Types Of Dental Bridges

Dental bridges have many advantages for people who are missing teeth as a result of dental disease, fractures or injury. If you maintain good oral hygiene and see your dentist regularly, a fixed dental bridge can last for approximately 10 years.

A dental bridge consists of dental crowns for the teeth anchoring either side of the bridge, and a false tooth (or teeth) between them. There are three main types of bridges:
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Get Braces Off Sooner

How To Get Your Braces Off Sooner

Things You Can Do To Get Your Braces Off Quicker

Braces can help realign your teeth and make for a nice smile, but even so many people want to get them off as soon as possible. There are several things you can do to help keep your mouth clean and help let your braces do the work they need to. Some things you can do to help your get your braces off as soon as possible include:

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How to Clean Braces

Braces Do A Lot

Braces do a lot more than improve your smile. They also play an active role in correcting overcrowded and misaligned teeth. This is important because an abnormal bite (also known as “malocclusion”) may cause other problems, such as impaired plaque removal around misaligned teeth, which can lead to gum inflammation and cavities.

Taking good care of braces can help prevent damage to the braces themselves and the teeth underneath as well as make the braces more comfortable to wear. Learning the basics of orthodontic care will help you follow your dental professional’s recommendations to keep your teeth and gums healthy during the time you’re wearing braces.

The Basics: Brushing And Flossing

Careful cleaning is required with braces, because plaque bacteria are easily trapped inside and around them. The following procedure will make daily brushing and flossing both simple and effective.

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Facts About Tooth Decay

Facts About Tooth Decay

Article Featured on ncohf.org

Did you know that pediatric dental disease, also referred to as childhood tooth decay, is the #1 chronic childhood illness?  When left untreated, childhood tooth decay can have devastasting consequences that extend beyond the dental chair. Rampant decay can negatively impact a child’s overall quality of life, inhibit their cognitive and social development and compromise their growth, function and self esteem.

  • Pediatric dental disease is 5 times more common than asthma and 7 times more common than hay fever.
  • Left untreated, pediatric dental disease can lead to malnourishment, bacterial infections, required emergency surgery and even death.
  • Pain and infection caused by tooth decay can lead to problems in eating, speaking and learning.
  • Dental disease has been linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, pneumonia, poor pregnancy outcomes and dementia.

THE GOOD NEWS? TOOTH DECAY IS PREVENTABLE!

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